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Smack upside the head

I like the following. My Dad sent it to me which somewhat surprised me because a lot of it is accurate to my opinions. I especially like Article VIII. It is comforting given this came from a fraternity of retired military officers.

"We, the sensible people of the United States, in an attempt to help everyone get along, restore some semblance of justice, avoid any more riots, keep our nation safe, promote positive behavior, and secure the blessings of debt free liberty to ourselves and our great-great-great-grandchildren, hereby try one more time to ordain and establish some common sense guidelines for the terminally whiny, guilt ridden, and delusional.

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that a whole lot of people are confused by the Bill of Rights and are so dim that they require a Bill of No Rights".

ARTICLE I: You do not have the right to a new car, big screen TV or any other form of wealth. More power to you if you can legally acquire them, but no one is guaranteeing anything.

ARTICLE II: You do not have the right to never be offended. This country is based on freedom, and that means freedom for everyone -- not just you! You may leave the room, turn the channel, express a different opinion, etc., but the world is full of idiots, and probably always will be ... and like the rest of us you need to simply deal with it.

ARTICLE III: You do not have the right to be free from harm. If you stick a screwdriver in your eye, learn to be more careful, do not expect the tool manufacturer to make you and all your relatives independently wealthy.

ARTICLE IV: You do not have the right to free food and housing. Americans are the most charitable people to be found, and will gladly help anyone in need, but we are quickly growing weary of subsidizing generation after generation of professional couch potatoes who achieve nothing more than the creation of another generation of professional couch potatoes.

ARTICLE V: You do not have the right to free health care. That would be nice, but from the looks of public housing, we're just not interested in public health care.

ARTICLE VI: You do not have the right to physically harm other people. If you kidnap, rape, intentionally maim, or kill someone, don't be surprised if the rest of us want to see you fry in the electric chair.

ARTICLE VII: You do not have the right to the possessions of others. If you rob, cheat or coerce away the goods or services of other citizens, don't be surprised if the rest of us get together and lock you away in a place where you still won't have the right to a big screen color TV, pool tables, weight rooms or a life of leisure.

ARTICLE VIII: You don't have the right to demand that our children risk their lives in foreign wars to soothe your aching conscience. We hate oppressive governments and won't lift a finger to stop you from going to fight if you'd like. However, we do not enjoy parenting the entire world and do not want to spend so much of our time battling each and every little tyrant with a military uniform and a funny hat.

ARTICLE IX: You don't have the right to a job. All of us sure want you to have a job, and will gladly help
you along in hard times, but we expect you to take advantage of the opportunities of part time jobs, education and vocational training laid before you to make yourself useful.

ARTICLE X: You do not have the right to happiness. Being an American means that you have the right to PURSUE happiness -- which by the way, is a lot easier if you are unencumbered by an overabundance of idiotic laws created by those of you who were confused by the Bill of Rights."

ARTICLE XI: This is an English speaking country. We don't care where you are from. We welcome you here.English is our language and like the one you left behind, we also have a culture. Learn it or go back to the country and the living conditions you were fleeing. If you agree, share this with a friend. No, you don't have to, and nothing tragic will befall you if you don't. I just think it is about time common sense is allowed to flourish - call it the age of reason revisited.

Peace,

Wander

Comments

( 16 comments — Leave a comment )
(Deleted comment)
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:19 am (UTC)
Re: Very interesting but...
Well like even the Bill of Rights this could be seen to be a work in progress. I agree our healthcare costs should not be so high. In all fairness mine are not because my doctor still makes house calls and only charges $5 per visit. I think more doctors should be like that. I don't know that I agree with free healthcare. I agree we could pull it off certainly if we didn't spend our National budget on various other frivalous things but I think we've got a long way to go before it happens.

As for the language thing. I've seen what you describe and I've also seen the opposite. In fact locally I've seen Hispanics at the DMV who refuse to speak English even if they might know how. This has neccesitated the DMV hiring a translator who is on hand to assist those who can't or won't speak English in getting driver's licenses and etc. I've seen a lot of people who expect towns and businesses to make concessions to them so they don't have to learn English. But that may be a regional thing too.

Wander
green_noise
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:32 am (UTC)
Re: Very interesting but...
Yeah, it is a regional thing here in Canada as well. In Toronto, for example, a city of about 3 million people, fully 300,000 cite Chinese as their primary language. That's a whole city's worth of people right there, and it only makes sense for our government to provide some services in their native language to help run things more smoothly. When you have this many people contributing to the city's economy, it's easier to justify spending money to make them happy. I mean, what else are we going to spend the money on, if not serving the needs of citizens?

But that's Toronto. Much of the rest of the country, you better be prepared with sufficient English (and/or French) skills otherwise you're not going to get far at all. America is the same. There are a few places in America you can go if you refuse to speak English... but epecting service in 50 languages in every major and minor city is asking for way too much.

(then again, such services could be easily paid for by reducing military spending, and retraining displaced soldiers to be translators, but I digress)
mrlapage
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:49 am (UTC)
Re: Very interesting but...
That's very surprising. I live in an area where it would be very easy for someone to get by not learning English yet no acquaintances nor the people we serve seem to be refusing to do so.
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 10:28 am (UTC)
Re: Very interesting but...
In the particular place I'm talking about, there is sort of a conflict between Anglos and Latinos. A lot of resentment on both sides. Some of it founded and some of it not, so I think they see this refusal to speak English as a way of wining a little for their side. It's more a scapegoat thing. Neither group is really to blame. But I think for the Latinos in this case it may be a way to be a thorn in the side of a larger group who doesn't want to grant them any concessions to become acculturated.

Wander
mrlapage
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:12 am (UTC)
Very interesting but...
I would take exception to articles V and XI.

As for V, we should have the right to free health care and it should work the way going to the doctor worked in the first half of this century. A good addendum would be "To doctors: You do not have the right to be rich because you provide a life saving service. Nurses, medical technicians, police and fire provide the same service at reasonable rates."

XI, I don't know anyone except a few very old Latinas who refuse to learn English. Why wouldn't they? It only facilitates everything they do everyday. All the bilingual signs that are around are not an effort to make the country bilingual (godforbid we become Swiss), it's only to make things easier as they acculturate. It's a misguided notion to think that bilingual signs or assistance is to keep anyone speaking their native tongue over English.

I would say there is no one in the country except the newest immigrant who is not relatively fluent in English. I've never met one.
mrlapage
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:13 am (UTC)
Interesting but...
I would take exception to articles V and XI.

As for V, we should have the right to free health care and it should work the way going to the doctor worked in the first half of this century. A good addendum would be "To doctors: You do not have the right to be rich because you provide a life saving service. Nurses, medical technicians, police and fire provide the same service at reasonable rates."

XI, I don't know anyone except a few very old Latinas who refuse to learn English. Why wouldn't they? It only facilitates everything they do everyday. All the bilingual signs that are around are not an effort to make the country bilingual (godforbid we become Swiss), it's only to make things easier as they acculturate. It's a misguided notion to think that bilingual signs or assistance is to keep anyone speaking their native tongue over English.

I would say there is no one in the country under 21,except the newest immigrant, who is not relatively fluent in English. I've never met one.
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:21 am (UTC)
Re: Interesting but...
Hey, I got this three times. Good ole LJ servers! By the way, did you get the Illustrator files?

Wander
mrlapage
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:34 am (UTC)
Re: Interesting but...
Only read the last one, I found an error in the other, don't know about the third one.

Yes I did get the Illustrator pix. Thank you. Didn't realize I hadn't acknowledged them, sorry. They will be very helpful. I'm getting there.

What did you do your icon with?

Mr. La Page
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 09:49 am (UTC)
Re: Interesting but...
Photoshop mostly. But it's really a painting done by an Southwestern painter named JD Challenger. I fell in love with his work when I lived in Taos, NM some years ago. I use photoshop for most of my icons because I'm a photo pro by trade. I have a bunch of artisit in my employ who use Illustrator almost exclusively. Mostly I use it to fix things rahter than create. But if I had more reason to use it to create i would because it is a very versatile program.

Wander
namaste21
Feb. 12th, 2003 10:01 am (UTC)
My opinion is:

If we can't get free healthcare, then someone needs to seriously look at what doctors are charging. I took Joel to the doctor for an ear infection. The doctor looks in his ear, nose, throat, listens to his back, tells me it's an ear infection, then hands me a prescription. All less than five minutes and I get handed a $72 bill. What the fuck? I mean, I know they have to pay off med school loans but that's a bit unreasonable. For $72 he should be giving Joel a physical and checking out some other things, too. That didn't include the $38 three-day supply of medicine. That was over $10 per tablespoon. I KNOW that azithromycin is not that expensive to manufacture -- they've been doing it since I was a child, at least. It is outrageous, in my opinion, how healthcare continously rips off the masses and then gets in a huff when the non-insured can't pay up front. And health insurance companies are no deal, either.

As for public housing, I realize that some people need it. I know people who work four and five jobs and still don't make enough to make ends meet. And if you're working four or five jobs, then you're not really a couch potato, in my opinion -- you're what they call underemployed. I think welfare has it's problems, but if you look at the millions of people it has helped when life slapped them down, then it's worth it. I was on it once for a short while, and I pay my taxes and contribute to society in the same way everyone else does. In fact, I'm more willing to pay taxes now that I know the system can actually help people.

Finally, while I agree that if you come here you should attempt to learn English, I think too often people are quick to judge foreigners. English isn't exactly EASY to learn. And it takes a while. Which is why I think dual-languages should 1)be taught in public schools and 2) be more available at businesses. I don't think it hurts an American to learn another language, either. Where I live, the Spanish-speaking population is rising so quickly you just can't avoid it. And yet a school gets upset that they have to offer an English-speaking-for-Spanish-students course -- how else do you expect them to learn? I rarely find that foreigners refuse to speak the language here, I just find that they have a hard time learning it.

Eh, okay. That's enough.
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 12:16 pm (UTC)
Re:
I think most of this is aimed at people who just refuse to be productive members of society. Those who could work but choose not to because they can get welfare or other governement services. Or those who are just looking for a way to be uncomfortable so they can sue someone. And beleive me, they are everywhere. People who don't seem to realize that with rights come responsibilities. People who refuse to work and then complain that they can't afford healthcare on what Welfare provides for them because they think they have the right not to work and let everyone else support them if that's what they choose.

As for the language thing, I think most foreigners who come here with the idea of staying here want to learn. But there are some and unfortunately they are the ones who are most noticed sometimes that think we should learn their language in order to help them. If I were to go and live in another country, I would expect to have to learn the language to interact and not expect the people from that country to learn my language just so they could communicate with me. I don't see anything wrong with teaching English as a second language classes but I do see something wrong with people who either refuse to learn or refuse to speak English and expect us to provide a means of understanding their language.

Wander
namaste21
Feb. 12th, 2003 12:50 pm (UTC)
Oh, I realized that -- it was just the sarcastic tone of the piece that gets you concerned. It's a valid point (all of them). We shouldn't have people trying to live off the system, we shouldn't have to make concessions in 50 different languages, etc. I suppose I get a little over-sensitive to the whole welfare-attack because I've had a time in my life when I needed to use it, I used it, and because I had it I got out of being homeless and was able to improve my life. I grew up near a family in which all I heard from the mother was how everyone cheated welfare, which simply isn't the case.
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 01:02 pm (UTC)
Re:
Yeah, I've had to use comodities adn food stamps and the like before as well so I know it can be helpful. Still, I know too many who simply live off whatever they cane get with no thought of ever working for a living. I knew a bunch of guys in NM who would work demolition jobs with me. They would work the maximum ammount they could and still no have to report it to Welfare adn then still get their Welfare checks as well as food stamps and monthly comodities distributions. Every Friday night they would get a keg and have a party and then go back to work for a few hours the next week to keep the cycle going.

Wander

kittles
Feb. 12th, 2003 10:25 am (UTC)
I think I'm probably the only person so far to agree with *all* of them. ;) Granted, I feel that in some of these cases, the fact that there is a problem (health care, affordable housing, language barriers) should tell us that we need some fundamental reform to help resolve them. But for the most part, especially when it comes to being offended and feeling like we all have a right to feel "safe," I wholeheartedly agree.
wander
Feb. 12th, 2003 10:30 am (UTC)
Re:
I can see where they might need to bend to fit certain situations but for the most part things have gotten way out of hand.

Wander
jezabel_pheonix
Feb. 13th, 2003 09:17 am (UTC)
Lol,omg this is great,Im sending this to my friends!
( 16 comments — Leave a comment )